Which Marijuana Stock Could Be The First to $1 Billion?

There are already several high-performing marijuana stocks on the NASDAQ today, and some investors are already wondering, which will be the first to reach $1 billion in market capitalization?

Over the last couple years the marijuana industry has been growing like a– well– growing like a weed!

According to Forbes Magazine, at the marijuana industry’s current rate of phenomenal growth (even faster than the dot com boom of the 2000s), we can expect to see legal marijuana business sales north of $20 billion by the year 2021 just five years from now.

U.S. public opinion in favor of legal marijuana is more robust than ever and on an upward trend while 29 states have legalized medical marijuana and several of them like California, Colorado, Alaska, and Washington have legalized it for recreational consumption.

As the inevitability of legalized marijuana businesses nationwide becomes more and more apparent, and as marijuana business sales take off into the stratosphere in 2017, there’s already chatter out there about which marijuana business stock will be the first to top a $1 billion valuation.

The Motley Fool, a multimedia financial services company that employs 300 people in Alexandria, Virginia, providing financial and investment advice since 1993, has raised the question and says the five marijuana stocks most likely to hit that big triple comma stock valuation are:

1. GW Pharmaceuticals (NASDAQ:GWPH) – A cannabinoid-based drug developer that currently has the highest market cap by far of any marijuana stock.

2. Corbus Pharmaceuticals (NASDAQ:CRBP) – It’s more of a high-risk, high-reward stock than GW Pharmaceuticals, because if one specific clinical trial for a synthetic oral endocannabinoid-mimetic drug goes its way, Corbus could leap to $1 billion in annual sales with a medical marijuana treatment for cystic fibrosis, which is notoriously difficult to treat.

3. Canopy Growth Corp. (NASDAQOTH:TWMJF) – A Canadian producer and retail seller of medical marijuana products and oils. (Medical marijuana has been legal in Canada since 2001.) Canopy just completed its acquisition of Mettrum Health earlier this year, and got a 472,000 square foot facility for it that includes its current corporate headquarters, plus access to more medical marijuana patients.

4. Aphria (NASDAQOTH:APHQF) – Aphria is one of Canopy’s biggest competitors, and holds the distinction of being one of the most consistently profitable marijuana stocks after reporting five consecutive quarterly profits.

5. Aurora Cannabis (NASDAQOTH:ACBFF) – Aurora Cannabis has been light on profits lately, but only because of an aggressive round of expansion-based spending, which it says will increase its marijuana plant production capacity nearly ninefold, after investing in creating the most technologically advanced automated cannabis-grow facility in the world.

Cannabis: The Key to a Better Life for Parkinson’s Patients

Image result for parkinson's disease

 

Cannabis treatment is a powerful tool, one that may also help with mobility disorders, like Parkinson’s. Its performance so far is staggering. Considering how debilitating Parkinson’s Disease (PD) is, medical marijuana could dramatically improve the lives of countless Americans.

PD has a variety of treatments to combat its debilitating symptoms, but predictably, marijuana isn’t on that list. According to the Parkinson’s Disease Foundation (PDF), this degenerative “movement disorder” affects almost one million people in the United States.

Ironically, millions of dollars continue to be spent trying to find effective countermeasures. Yet judging by recent discoveries, the solution was right under our noses since the dawn of agriculture. Once again, medical cannabis appears to have the answer – with remarkable results.

What is Parkinson’s Disease?

The PDF explains that Parkinson’s Disease involves the “malfunction and death” of neurons in the brain. Neurons play a variety of roles, with movement control being just one of them. Naturally, the death of these cells affects their associated functions. Symptoms worsen as time goes on, ultimately causing severe debilitation of movement control.

Parkinson’s symptoms include tremors in the extremities, jaw and face; slow movement (bradykinesia), body stiffness and issues with balance or coordination. Aside from drastically reducing quality of life, these afflictions have something else in common. They are all things that cannabis could reduce or alleviate.

A Case for Cannabis and Parkinson’s Disease

Despite significant push-back from the medical community, evidence mounts in favor of medical marijuana. Adding to the growing body of anecdotal evidence, this video all but seals the argument.

The video features “Larry,” a retired police officer who suffers from “Severe Parkinson’s” using cannabis – in this case, oil – for the first time. Naturally, he’s a bit nervous, but the people off camera talk him through it.

Within minutes, he goes from barely being able to speak or control his movements, to relaxed and still. He speaks clearly and even gives singing a brief try. The transformation is nothing short of shocking. Sadly, Larry laments that medical cannabis isn’t available in his home state.

Benefits of Cannabis Treatment

Although still lacking much peer-reviewed research, marijuana seems promising as a treatment for Parkinson’s Disease. For instance, a study in the U.S. National Library of Medicine explains: “Preclinical research in animal models of several movement disorders have shown variable evidence for symptomatic benefits but more consistently suggest potential neuroprotective effects in several animal models of Parkinson’s (PD) and Huntington’s disease (HD).”

In other words, not only could marijuana effectively mitigate symptoms of Parkinson’s Disease, but it protects existing, healthy cells.

While the medical community continues to debate the benefits and drawbacks, the National Parkinson Foundation acknowledges the benefits of marijuana. They advocate how cannabis can help with “pain management, sleep dysfunction, weight loss and nausea” in Parkinson’s patients.

<h2>Parkinson’s Disease and Cannabis Risks</h2>

Individuals who intend to try medical marijuana for Parkinson’s have a great deal to gain; however, it’s important to be informed about potential side effects.

Obviously, the most prominent effect is the physical and mental impairment, or “high.” The National Parkinson’s Foundation also lists other symptoms, specifically “…dizziness, blurring of vision, mood and behavioral changes, loss of balance and hallucinations.”

They also warn that extended use could increase the chances of lung cancer; however, since cannabis comes in oral drops or pills, simply avoid things such as joints, pipes or bongs.

The Future of Cannabis and Parkinson’s Disease

Ultimately, only time will tell whether marijuana will be universally accepted as a treatment. As we see in “Larry’s” case, this potential discovery can’t be ignored. Hopefully, individuals with Parkinson’s Disease will be able to safely reap its benefits.

 

 

Florida Marijuana Company Invents Way to Grow Marijuana Faster, Without Soil

marijuana hydroponics

In the context of marijuana growing or not, you may have heard of hydroponic gardening, but a marijuana company in Florida is growing marijuana plants out of thin air in a process called “Aeroponics.”

A local Florida news affiliate is reporting that Tampa Bay is home to an agricultural revolution: growing plants without soil, sand, gravel, liquid, or any other substrate.

Although Aeroponics as a plant growing technique has been around for a while, used to grow lettuce and wheat with the plant suspended in mid air, roots exposed and everything, and nourished and watered with a nutrient rich mist, the St.Petersburg marijuana company has mastered growing the marijuana plant in record time using this technique.

Doug Fyvolent of Solaridy says aeroponics are have resulted in “Growing the plants 10 percent faster.” The marijuana company uses a ten-foot-tall proprietary “CropTower,” which makes good use of space as well, growing upward and not outward. Doug says they got the idea from NASA scientists researching methods of gardening in space and improved on their techniques.

Fyvolent masterminded Solaridy after researching the marijuana industry and learning that having enough space was a major problem for cannabis growers. Fyvolent touts the space-saving, square-footage maximizing benefit of his product:

“It allows you to maximize the square footage you already have, saving you the headaches, costs and time of looking for a bigger warehouse.”

The CropTower comes equipped with special cups that prevents the suspended plants from falling out. The custom design for the waterfall system for keeping the plants hydrated and nourished took two years to develop: “We will pump the water in and it will rain over the roots, then we recycle the water into a tan.”

The CropTower can really maximize square footage for a small marijuana company that grows its own plants. Taking three square feet as an example, a grower should be able to grow about nine cannabis plants on the ground, which should yield around two pounds of viable marijuana plant matter.

Using the CropTower, however, a marijuana company can grow 104 cannabis plants in the same amount of space, yielding around 30 pounds. The way the CropTower works is by keeping the roots of the plants moist. The company says it allows pesticide free growing as well and fewer worries about bugs.

Presently the Solaridy crop tower is being leased for use by cannabis growers in Denver, Colorado but Fyvolent hopes that future changes to marijuana laws in Florida will open the door to using the product in his own state.

Marijuana’s Impact on the Brain in This New Study Should Encourage Investing in Marijuana

marijuana capsules

Investing in marijuana keeps looking better and better. Earlier this month researchers at Oxford University in the U.K. published the results of a bombshell study that found marijuana can have a positive impact on a brain in decline.

Doses of THC appear to improve memory and learning abilities in older mice suffering from cognitive decline. The implications for human sufferers of age-related cognitive decline, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and other forms of dementia are full of hope.

Researchers are studying THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) in a £10 million ($13 million) program to “identify new medical therapies through research into the molecular, cellular and systems mechanisms of cannabinoids.”

In the study, published by Nature Medicine, and publicized in a highly cited Newsweek article, “researchers led by Andreas Zimmer, from the University of Bonn, Germany, have shown how THC can provide significant benefits to mice when it comes to age-related cognitive decline.”

To study how THC might affect a brain in decline, researchers administered small doses of THC to mice at 2 months, 12 months, and 18 months- the latter two control groups representing mature and elderly mice.

The team did three experiments.

The first involved teaching mice to navigate a water maze. As expected mature and old mice performed worse than the young group. Then the team treated the older groups with THC, and amazingly found a significant improvement at the task. (Interestingly enough the young mice did much worse after receiving THC doses.)

The second test involved teaching mice to locate objects. Older mice given THC were able to perform as well as the younger mice that had not been administered with the drug.

The third test was related to partner recognition of other mice and also demonstrated the efficacy of THC in improved cognitive performance for mature and elderly mice.

The team wrote:

“Together, these results reveal a profound, long-lasting improvement of cognitive performance resulting from a low dose of THC treatment in mature and old animals.”

The Motley Fool, an Alexandria, Virginia-based financial services and investing company said Sunday that these findings should encourage investing in marijuana businesses:

“The marijuana industry, and marijuana stocks for that matter, have been expanding by leaps and bounds over the past two decades. What was once a completely taboo industry has become a thriving source of legal growth, at least in some states…

What studies like this do is really fan the flame of what might be possible with cannabis-based medicines. While many of the ongoing studies are considered informal in nature — i.e., they’re not being overseen by an accredited regulatory body like the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) — some developing pot-based drugs have really turned heads.”

If investing in marijuana is of interest to you, then you may be excited to know about the first actively managed marijuana ETFs on their way.

Our Very First Actively Managed Marijuana ETF May Be On Its Way

Cannabis Investment

US SEC CLEARS WAY FOR CANNABIS EFTs

On Friday, May 5th, Cambria Investment Management filed an N-1A form with the US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) for not just one, but five new ETFs. The diverse basket of proposed funds cover a wide range of industries (real estate, cannabis, robotics and AI), and also include two tax optimized funds – one domestic and one foreign.

The stand-out of the bunch – and the one that is perhaps kicking up the most attention – is the Cambria Marijuana Industry ETF. The proposed fund, if successfully launched by Cambria, will be given the ticker “TOKE.”

Cambria’s Marijuana ETF will track publicly traded companies that support or directly work in the legal production of cannabis, including: companies that legally produce marijuana, those that conduct legal research into its medical or pharmaceutical use, and those that design and manufacture equipment used in the marijuana sector.

While it may be the first cleverly-named marijuana ETF, TOKE is not the first ETF to deal in cannabis-related stocks. The proposed fund will follow on the heels of the first-ever marijuana ETF, the Horizons Medical Marijuana Life Sciences ETF (TSX:HMMJ) – which launched at $10.00 per share last month and is now sitting at $9.59. While the fund trades in Canada, American investors have been able to get in on the action via its listing on the OTC.

Horizon’s ETF isn’t alone, either. In February, a filing popped up for a fund called the Emerging AgroSphere ETF. The proposed fund, which comes from New Jersey-based ETF Managers Group, will include companies exclusively in the medical marijuana space and – if approved – will list on the NYSE Arca.

Both HMMJ and the Emerging AgroSphere ETF are passively managed, meaning the indexes they are based on dictate their performance. This means that TOKE has the potential to be the first actively managed ETF in North America. At the time of writing, there is no indication yet as to when the two remaining ETFs might launch.

There is still no telling how well these (hopefully) soon-to-be-launched ETFs will perform in the market, especially considering the fact that HMMJ has declined by about four percent since it began trading. But, at the same time more and more states are legalizing medical cannabis, and – according to Arcview Market Research – sales in the marijuana sector as a whole grew 30 percent in 2016 alone. The industry is also projected to triple in size over the next four years.